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SAT At a Glance

What is SAT?

The SAT exam is an admissions test used by many colleges and universities to assess a potential student’s academic strengths and readiness for college. Standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT are used in the admissions process along with other factors such as high school grades, class rank, community service, recommendations and extracurricular activities. The intent of the SAT is to measure a student’s capabilities in the core areas of reading, writing and mathematics.

Why Take the SAT?

  • Universally AcceptedAll major universities in the United States accept the SAT as a college entrance exam.
  • Take the SAT For Money – Money often follows an impressive SAT score. Check into your college of choice’s SAT scholarship requirements. Many schools dole out huge bucks for great SAT scores.
  • Take the SAT To Balance A Low GPA – So maybe you didn’t have 4.0 gpa. That doesn’t mean you don’t have the brain skills to survive college. Scoring high on the SAT can show off your smarts to the college admissions team when your GPA doesn’t.
  • Some Jobs Require SAT Scores – This doesn’t apply just to jobs in the test prep arena, either; a surprising range of companies ask job-seekers, from entry-level consulting applicants to senior-level banking applicants, to cough up old SAT or ACT scores.

How Important is SAT Score in College Admissions?

Percentage of Colleges Reporting “Considerable or Moderate Importance”

Grades in college prep courses
91%
Grades in all courses
88%
Strength of curriculum
88%
Admission test scores (SAT, ACT)
87%
Essay or writing sample
60%

Source: 2014 NACAC State of College Admissions

SAT Facts

Current Test Dates

Test DateRegistration DeadlineLate Registration DeadlineSAT Subject Tests Available
Oct. 07, 2017Sept. 08, 2017Sept. 27, 2017Literature, U.S. History, Mathematics Level 1, Mathematics Level 2, Biology E/M, Chemistry, Physics, French, Spanish
Nov. 04, 2017Oct. 05, 2017Oct. 25, 2017Literature, U.S. History, Mathematics Level 1, Mathematics Level 2, Biology E/M, Chemistry, Physics, French with Listening, German with Listening, Spanish with Listening, Chinese with Listening, Japanese with Listening, Korean with Listening
Dec. 02, 2016Nov. 02, 2017Nov. 21, 2017Literature U.S. History World History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology E/M Chemistry Physics French Spanish Latin
May 05, 2018April 6, 2018April 25, 2018Literature U.S. History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology E/M Chemistry Physics French Spanish
June 2, 2018May 3, 2018May 23, 2018Literature U.S. History World History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology E/M Chemistry Physics French German Spanish Modern Hebrew Italian Latin

Recommended Reading

Additional Resources

  • Official Websites:

The College Board (SAT)

PSAT/NMSQT

  • Free Prep Resources:

KhanAcademy.org

Number2.com

 

ACT At a Glance

What is ACT?

The ACT is a nationally administered, standardized paper-and-pencil test that helps colleges evaluate candidates. The ACT is designed to assess what high school students have learned in school. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. The optional Writing Test measures skill in planning and writing a short essay.

Why Take the ACT?

  • Universally Accepted- The ACT Assessment is accepted by virtually all colleges and universities in the U.S., including all of the Ivy League schools.
  • Scholarships – Colleges use ACT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships.
  • Curriculum Based – The ACT is and always has been a curriculum-based achievement test, measuring what a student has learned in school. Students frequently tell us that they feel more comfortable taking the ACT since it is directly related to what they learn in most of their high school courses. The current SAT is more of an aptitude test, testing reasoning and verbal abilities.
  • Competitive Edge – The ACT might be considered “harder,” because the ACT is more fast-paced and requires students to answers every question much faster, but if you do well with fast-paced assignments and can stay focused for long periods of time, you have a huge competitive edge on the ACT.

How Important is ACT Scores in College Admissions?

Percentage of Colleges Reporting “Considerable or Moderate Importance”

Grades in college prep courses
91%
Grades in all courses
88%
Strength of curriculum
88%
Admission test scores (SAT, ACT)
87%
Essay or writing sample
60%

Source: 2014 NACAC State of College Admissions

ACT Facts

Current Test Dates

Test DateRegistration DeadlineLate Registration Deadline
September 9, 2017August 4, 2017August 5-18, 2017
October 28, 2017September 22, 2017September 23-October 6, 2017
December 9, 2017November 3, 2017November 4-17, 2017
February 10, 2018January 12, 2018January 13-19, 2018
April 14, 2018March 9, 2018March 10-23, 2018
June 9, 2018May 4, 2018May 5-18, 2018

Recommended Reading

Additional Resources

  • Official Websites:

The ACT Test

  • Free Prep Resources:

Number2.com

ESEE At a Glance

What is ISEE?

The ISEE, otherwise known as the Independent School Entrance Exam. The ISEE is a standard assessment of skills for each applicant for Grade 2-12, ranking his or her reasoning and achievement skills among students in the same grade. It enables students to take a single, fair, and reliable test for entrance into top-performing independent schools. The test has four levels:

  • Primary – entrance to grades 2 – 4; available as an online administration only
  • Lower – entrance to grades 5 – 6; available in both online and paper/pencil administrations
  • Middle – entrance to grades 7 – 8; available in both online and paper/pencil administrations
  • Upper – entrance to grades 9 – 12; available in both online and paper/pencil administrations

Why Take the ISEE?

  • Gain Acceptance into a Private School
  • Add an Edge to Your Private School Application – Scoring high on the ISEE gives students a greater chance of being accepted to the private school of their choosing

Test Format

The ISEE consists of :

    • A 20 minute verbal reasoning section
    • A 35 minute quantitative reasoning section
    • A 25 (lower level)/35 (middle and upper level) minute reading comprehension section
    • A 30 (lower level)/40 (middle and upper level) minute mathematics section
    • A 30 minute essay

Test Length

    • ISEE Lower Level Exam: 2 hours and 20 minutes
    • ISEE Middle Level Exam: 2 hours and 40 minutes
    • ISEE Upper Level Exam: 2 hours and 40 minutes

Test Structure

    • Verbal Reasoning: The verbal reasoning section consists of “vocabulary” and “sentence completion” type questions and is twenty minutes long.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The quantitative reasoning section contains various word problems and is thirty five minutes long.
    • Reading Comprehension: The reading comprehension section consists of a passage and corresponding questions related to the passage.
    • Mathematics Achievement: The mathematics achievement section is 30 minutes for lower level students and 40 minutes for middle and upper level students.

Essay: Students are given a “prompt” or topic that is grade-level appropriate and they are asked to write a response to it.

Current Test Dates

Starting in Fall 2016, students may register to take the ISEE up to three times in a 12-month admission cycle, once in any or all of three testing seasons. The seasons are Fall (August­–November), Winter (December–March), and Spring/Summer (April­–July).

Official Website

SSAT At a Glance

What is SSAT?

The Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT) is a standardized test that many students applying to private or independent middle and high schools take as part of the application/admissions process. 

The Elementary Level SSAT is administered to children in 3rd and 4th grades who are applying for admission to 4th and 5th grades.  The Middle Level SSAT is for children in grades 5-7 who seek admission into grades 6-8.  The Upper Level SSAT is given to children in grades 8 through 11 who are applying for admission to grades 9 through PG.

Why Take the SSAT?

  • Gain Acceptance into a Private School
  • Add an Edge to Your Private School Application – Scoring high on the SSAT gives students a greater chance of being accepted to the private school of their choosing

Test Facts

  • Test Format: The SSAT consists of three main sections (Verbal, Math, and Reading), plus a writing sample that either takes the form of a creative writing assignment or an essay.
  • Test Length:
    • Elementary Level: 1 hour, 50 minutes
    • Middle and Upper Levels: 3 hours, 5 minutes
  • Test Structure:
    • Verbal: 30 synonym questions, 30 analogy questions, vocabulary and verbal reasoning skills.
    • Quantitative: 50 multiple-choice questions, math computation and reasoning.
    • Reading: 7 reading passages and 40 questions, reading comprehension
    • Writing Sample: 1 essay prompt, writing skills

Current Test Dates

    • 2016: Oct. 15th, Nov. 12th, Dec. 10th
    • 2017: Jan. 7th, Feb. 11th, Mar. 4th, Apr. 22nd, Jun. 10th

Official Website

Test DateRegular Registration DeadlineLate Registration DeadlineRush Registration
October 15, 2016September 24, 2016October 1, 2016October 1-12, 2016
November 12, 2016October 22, 2016October 29, 2016October 29 -November 9, 2016
December 10, 2016November 19, 2016November 26, 2016November 26 - December 7, 2016
January 7, 2017December 17, 2016December 24, 2016December 24, 2016 - January 4, 2017
March 4, 2017February 11, 2017February 18, 2017February 18 - March 1, 2017
April 22, 2017April 1, 2017April 8, 2017April 8 - April 19, 2017
June 10, 2017May 20, 2017May 27, 2017May 27 - June 7, 2017
TOEFL At a Glance

What is TOEFL?

TOEFL stands for Test of English as a Foreign Language. It is created by an organization called ETS (Educational Testing Service), a professional test development organization, based in the USA. The test measures the ability of non-native English speakers to use and understand the English language as it is heard, spoken, read and written in the university classroom.

Why Take the TOEFL?

    • Students who wish to attend an English speaking university or college but have learned English as a foreign language should take the TOEFL before applying to their chosen school. Many schools require the scores from this test for admission.
    • The TOEFL is the English language fluency assessment accepted by over 6,000 institutions.

Test Facts

  • Test Format: You can take the test online or on paper. There are four sections (listening, reading, speaking, and writing)
  • Test Length:
    • Internet-based test (iBT): 3 hours 10 minutes to 4 hours 20 minutes (excluding 10-minute break in-between).
    • Paper-based test (PBT): 2 hours 20 minutes to 2 hours 30 minutes.
  • Test Structure:
    • Reading– Read 3 or 4 passages from academic texts and answer questions.
    • Listening – Listen to lectures, classroom discussions and conversations, then answer questions.
    • Speaking – Express an opinion on a familiar topic; speak based on reading and listening tasks.
    • Writing – Write essay responses based on reading and listening tasks; support an opinion in writing.

Current Test Dates

    • The TOEFL iBT test, administered via the Internet, is offered more than 50 times a year at authorized test centers around the world.
    • The TOEFL PBT test is a paper test and is administered:
      • 2016: Oct. 15th, Nov. 12th
      • 2017: Jan. 7th, Apr. 1st

Official Website

AP Exams At a Glance

What is AP?

Advanced Placement is a program run by College Board (the makers of the SAT) that allows you to take courses right in your high school that can earn you college credit and/or qualify you for more advanced classes when you begin college. AP classes are offered in 34 subjects. The AP exam is a test of all the information you learn in an AP course. You earn college credit if you pass the AP exam given at the end of the year in May.

Why Take the AP Exams?

    • Challenge Yourself – Advanced Placement classes are rigorous and demanding, offering an intellectual stimulation that students won’t get in regular high school courses.
    • Improve Your College Resume – AP classes will raise the “wow” factor of a student’s high school record. If a student does well in an AP class, it’s a signal to admissions counselors that he or she is ready for the pressures of college study.
    • Earn College Credit – AP exams are scored on a scale of 1 (lowest) through 5 (highest). If a student earns a 3 or higher, he or she can receive course credits, advanced placement, or both upon arriving at college.
    • Scholarships – AP courses and exam scores help students qualify for scholarships.

Available Subjects

ArtsEnglishHistory & Social ScienceMath & Computer ScienceSciencesWorld Languages & CulturesCapstone
AP Art HistoryAP English Language and CompositionAP Comparative Government and PoliticsAP Calculus ABAP BiologyAP Chinese Language and CultureAP Research
AP Music TheoryAP English Literature and CompositionAP European HistoryAP Calculus BCAP ChemistryAP French Language and CultureAP Seminar
AP Studio Art: 2-D DesignAP Human GeographyAP Computer Science AAP Environmental ScienceAP German Language and Culture
AP Studio Art: 3-D DesignAP MacroeconomicsAP Computer Science PrinciplesAP Physics C: Electricity and MagnetismAP Italian Language and Culture
AP Studio Art: DrawingAP MicroeconomicsAP StatisticsAP Physics C: MechanicsAP Japanese Language and Culture
AP PsychologyAP Physics 1: Algebra-BasedAP Latin
AP United States Government and PoliticsAP Physics 2: Algebra-BasedAP Spanish Language and Culture
AP United States HistoryAP Spanish Literature and Culture
AP World History

Exam Dates

+ SAT
SAT At a Glance

What is SAT?

The SAT exam is an admissions test used by many colleges and universities to assess a potential student’s academic strengths and readiness for college. Standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT are used in the admissions process along with other factors such as high school grades, class rank, community service, recommendations and extracurricular activities. The intent of the SAT is to measure a student’s capabilities in the core areas of reading, writing and mathematics.

Why Take the SAT?

  • Universally AcceptedAll major universities in the United States accept the SAT as a college entrance exam.
  • Take the SAT For Money – Money often follows an impressive SAT score. Check into your college of choice’s SAT scholarship requirements. Many schools dole out huge bucks for great SAT scores.
  • Take the SAT To Balance A Low GPA – So maybe you didn’t have 4.0 gpa. That doesn’t mean you don’t have the brain skills to survive college. Scoring high on the SAT can show off your smarts to the college admissions team when your GPA doesn’t.
  • Some Jobs Require SAT Scores – This doesn’t apply just to jobs in the test prep arena, either; a surprising range of companies ask job-seekers, from entry-level consulting applicants to senior-level banking applicants, to cough up old SAT or ACT scores.

How Important is SAT Score in College Admissions?

Percentage of Colleges Reporting “Considerable or Moderate Importance”

Grades in college prep courses
91%
Grades in all courses
88%
Strength of curriculum
88%
Admission test scores (SAT, ACT)
87%
Essay or writing sample
60%

Source: 2014 NACAC State of College Admissions

SAT Facts

Current Test Dates

Test DateRegistration DeadlineLate Registration DeadlineSAT Subject Tests Available
Oct. 07, 2017Sept. 08, 2017Sept. 27, 2017Literature, U.S. History, Mathematics Level 1, Mathematics Level 2, Biology E/M, Chemistry, Physics, French, Spanish
Nov. 04, 2017Oct. 05, 2017Oct. 25, 2017Literature, U.S. History, Mathematics Level 1, Mathematics Level 2, Biology E/M, Chemistry, Physics, French with Listening, German with Listening, Spanish with Listening, Chinese with Listening, Japanese with Listening, Korean with Listening
Dec. 02, 2016Nov. 02, 2017Nov. 21, 2017Literature U.S. History World History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology E/M Chemistry Physics French Spanish Latin
May 05, 2018April 6, 2018April 25, 2018Literature U.S. History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology E/M Chemistry Physics French Spanish
June 2, 2018May 3, 2018May 23, 2018Literature U.S. History World History Mathematics Level 1 Mathematics Level 2 Biology E/M Chemistry Physics French German Spanish Modern Hebrew Italian Latin

Recommended Reading

Additional Resources

  • Official Websites:

The College Board (SAT)

PSAT/NMSQT

  • Free Prep Resources:

KhanAcademy.org

Number2.com

 

+ ACT
ACT At a Glance

What is ACT?

The ACT is a nationally administered, standardized paper-and-pencil test that helps colleges evaluate candidates. The ACT is designed to assess what high school students have learned in school. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. The optional Writing Test measures skill in planning and writing a short essay.

Why Take the ACT?

  • Universally Accepted- The ACT Assessment is accepted by virtually all colleges and universities in the U.S., including all of the Ivy League schools.
  • Scholarships – Colleges use ACT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships.
  • Curriculum Based – The ACT is and always has been a curriculum-based achievement test, measuring what a student has learned in school. Students frequently tell us that they feel more comfortable taking the ACT since it is directly related to what they learn in most of their high school courses. The current SAT is more of an aptitude test, testing reasoning and verbal abilities.
  • Competitive Edge – The ACT might be considered “harder,” because the ACT is more fast-paced and requires students to answers every question much faster, but if you do well with fast-paced assignments and can stay focused for long periods of time, you have a huge competitive edge on the ACT.

How Important is ACT Scores in College Admissions?

Percentage of Colleges Reporting “Considerable or Moderate Importance”

Grades in college prep courses
91%
Grades in all courses
88%
Strength of curriculum
88%
Admission test scores (SAT, ACT)
87%
Essay or writing sample
60%

Source: 2014 NACAC State of College Admissions

ACT Facts

Current Test Dates

Test DateRegistration DeadlineLate Registration Deadline
September 9, 2017August 4, 2017August 5-18, 2017
October 28, 2017September 22, 2017September 23-October 6, 2017
December 9, 2017November 3, 2017November 4-17, 2017
February 10, 2018January 12, 2018January 13-19, 2018
April 14, 2018March 9, 2018March 10-23, 2018
June 9, 2018May 4, 2018May 5-18, 2018

Recommended Reading

Additional Resources

  • Official Websites:

The ACT Test

  • Free Prep Resources:

Number2.com

+ ISEE
ESEE At a Glance

What is ISEE?

The ISEE, otherwise known as the Independent School Entrance Exam. The ISEE is a standard assessment of skills for each applicant for Grade 2-12, ranking his or her reasoning and achievement skills among students in the same grade. It enables students to take a single, fair, and reliable test for entrance into top-performing independent schools. The test has four levels:

  • Primary – entrance to grades 2 – 4; available as an online administration only
  • Lower – entrance to grades 5 – 6; available in both online and paper/pencil administrations
  • Middle – entrance to grades 7 – 8; available in both online and paper/pencil administrations
  • Upper – entrance to grades 9 – 12; available in both online and paper/pencil administrations

Why Take the ISEE?

  • Gain Acceptance into a Private School
  • Add an Edge to Your Private School Application – Scoring high on the ISEE gives students a greater chance of being accepted to the private school of their choosing

Test Format

The ISEE consists of :

    • A 20 minute verbal reasoning section
    • A 35 minute quantitative reasoning section
    • A 25 (lower level)/35 (middle and upper level) minute reading comprehension section
    • A 30 (lower level)/40 (middle and upper level) minute mathematics section
    • A 30 minute essay

Test Length

    • ISEE Lower Level Exam: 2 hours and 20 minutes
    • ISEE Middle Level Exam: 2 hours and 40 minutes
    • ISEE Upper Level Exam: 2 hours and 40 minutes

Test Structure

    • Verbal Reasoning: The verbal reasoning section consists of “vocabulary” and “sentence completion” type questions and is twenty minutes long.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The quantitative reasoning section contains various word problems and is thirty five minutes long.
    • Reading Comprehension: The reading comprehension section consists of a passage and corresponding questions related to the passage.
    • Mathematics Achievement: The mathematics achievement section is 30 minutes for lower level students and 40 minutes for middle and upper level students.

Essay: Students are given a “prompt” or topic that is grade-level appropriate and they are asked to write a response to it.

Current Test Dates

Starting in Fall 2016, students may register to take the ISEE up to three times in a 12-month admission cycle, once in any or all of three testing seasons. The seasons are Fall (August­–November), Winter (December–March), and Spring/Summer (April­–July).

Official Website

+ SSAT
SSAT At a Glance

What is SSAT?

The Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT) is a standardized test that many students applying to private or independent middle and high schools take as part of the application/admissions process. 

The Elementary Level SSAT is administered to children in 3rd and 4th grades who are applying for admission to 4th and 5th grades.  The Middle Level SSAT is for children in grades 5-7 who seek admission into grades 6-8.  The Upper Level SSAT is given to children in grades 8 through 11 who are applying for admission to grades 9 through PG.

Why Take the SSAT?

  • Gain Acceptance into a Private School
  • Add an Edge to Your Private School Application – Scoring high on the SSAT gives students a greater chance of being accepted to the private school of their choosing

Test Facts

  • Test Format: The SSAT consists of three main sections (Verbal, Math, and Reading), plus a writing sample that either takes the form of a creative writing assignment or an essay.
  • Test Length:
    • Elementary Level: 1 hour, 50 minutes
    • Middle and Upper Levels: 3 hours, 5 minutes
  • Test Structure:
    • Verbal: 30 synonym questions, 30 analogy questions, vocabulary and verbal reasoning skills.
    • Quantitative: 50 multiple-choice questions, math computation and reasoning.
    • Reading: 7 reading passages and 40 questions, reading comprehension
    • Writing Sample: 1 essay prompt, writing skills

Current Test Dates

    • 2016: Oct. 15th, Nov. 12th, Dec. 10th
    • 2017: Jan. 7th, Feb. 11th, Mar. 4th, Apr. 22nd, Jun. 10th

Official Website

Test DateRegular Registration DeadlineLate Registration DeadlineRush Registration
October 15, 2016September 24, 2016October 1, 2016October 1-12, 2016
November 12, 2016October 22, 2016October 29, 2016October 29 -November 9, 2016
December 10, 2016November 19, 2016November 26, 2016November 26 - December 7, 2016
January 7, 2017December 17, 2016December 24, 2016December 24, 2016 - January 4, 2017
March 4, 2017February 11, 2017February 18, 2017February 18 - March 1, 2017
April 22, 2017April 1, 2017April 8, 2017April 8 - April 19, 2017
June 10, 2017May 20, 2017May 27, 2017May 27 - June 7, 2017
+ TOEFL
TOEFL At a Glance

What is TOEFL?

TOEFL stands for Test of English as a Foreign Language. It is created by an organization called ETS (Educational Testing Service), a professional test development organization, based in the USA. The test measures the ability of non-native English speakers to use and understand the English language as it is heard, spoken, read and written in the university classroom.

Why Take the TOEFL?

    • Students who wish to attend an English speaking university or college but have learned English as a foreign language should take the TOEFL before applying to their chosen school. Many schools require the scores from this test for admission.
    • The TOEFL is the English language fluency assessment accepted by over 6,000 institutions.

Test Facts

  • Test Format: You can take the test online or on paper. There are four sections (listening, reading, speaking, and writing)
  • Test Length:
    • Internet-based test (iBT): 3 hours 10 minutes to 4 hours 20 minutes (excluding 10-minute break in-between).
    • Paper-based test (PBT): 2 hours 20 minutes to 2 hours 30 minutes.
  • Test Structure:
    • Reading– Read 3 or 4 passages from academic texts and answer questions.
    • Listening – Listen to lectures, classroom discussions and conversations, then answer questions.
    • Speaking – Express an opinion on a familiar topic; speak based on reading and listening tasks.
    • Writing – Write essay responses based on reading and listening tasks; support an opinion in writing.

Current Test Dates

    • The TOEFL iBT test, administered via the Internet, is offered more than 50 times a year at authorized test centers around the world.
    • The TOEFL PBT test is a paper test and is administered:
      • 2016: Oct. 15th, Nov. 12th
      • 2017: Jan. 7th, Apr. 1st

Official Website

+ AP
AP Exams At a Glance

What is AP?

Advanced Placement is a program run by College Board (the makers of the SAT) that allows you to take courses right in your high school that can earn you college credit and/or qualify you for more advanced classes when you begin college. AP classes are offered in 34 subjects. The AP exam is a test of all the information you learn in an AP course. You earn college credit if you pass the AP exam given at the end of the year in May.

Why Take the AP Exams?

    • Challenge Yourself – Advanced Placement classes are rigorous and demanding, offering an intellectual stimulation that students won’t get in regular high school courses.
    • Improve Your College Resume – AP classes will raise the “wow” factor of a student’s high school record. If a student does well in an AP class, it’s a signal to admissions counselors that he or she is ready for the pressures of college study.
    • Earn College Credit – AP exams are scored on a scale of 1 (lowest) through 5 (highest). If a student earns a 3 or higher, he or she can receive course credits, advanced placement, or both upon arriving at college.
    • Scholarships – AP courses and exam scores help students qualify for scholarships.

Available Subjects

ArtsEnglishHistory & Social ScienceMath & Computer ScienceSciencesWorld Languages & CulturesCapstone
AP Art HistoryAP English Language and CompositionAP Comparative Government and PoliticsAP Calculus ABAP BiologyAP Chinese Language and CultureAP Research
AP Music TheoryAP English Literature and CompositionAP European HistoryAP Calculus BCAP ChemistryAP French Language and CultureAP Seminar
AP Studio Art: 2-D DesignAP Human GeographyAP Computer Science AAP Environmental ScienceAP German Language and Culture
AP Studio Art: 3-D DesignAP MacroeconomicsAP Computer Science PrinciplesAP Physics C: Electricity and MagnetismAP Italian Language and Culture
AP Studio Art: DrawingAP MicroeconomicsAP StatisticsAP Physics C: MechanicsAP Japanese Language and Culture
AP PsychologyAP Physics 1: Algebra-BasedAP Latin
AP United States Government and PoliticsAP Physics 2: Algebra-BasedAP Spanish Language and Culture
AP United States HistoryAP Spanish Literature and Culture
AP World History

Exam Dates